Still Counting

"Still Counting" A book about 20 Years of CI's Rapid Assessment Program. PDF - 12 MB, also available on Amazon.com
Biodiversity Exploration for Conservation: The First 20 Years of the Rapid Assessment Program
Leeanne E. Alonso, Jessica L. Deichmann, Sheila A. McKenna, Piotr Naskrecki, and Stephen J. Richards
This exciting book outlines the inception, history, and achievements of Conservation International's Rapid Assessment Program (RAP) over its first two decades, 1990-2010. The philosophy and methodology of RAP, its major goals and results, and the "feet-in-the-mud" attitude that has made the program so effective are featured.

IN DEPTH: Learn more about CI's Rapid Assessment Program.

The book profiles nearly 80 expeditions to some of the most remote but often highly threatened sites around the world, highlighting the impacts of RAP surveys in relation to the establishment and improvement of protected areas, the discovery of species new to science, scientific capacity building, spatial planning for conservation, and enhancing human well-being. The book also features fascinating, personal stories from the field. Illustrated with hundreds of photos taken during the RAP surveys, this book includes the first photos of many newly discovered species of animals and plants, and other rarely photographed jewels of terrestrial, freshwater and marine biodiversity.

DOWNLOAD: Still Counting... Biodiversity Exploration for Conservation: The First 20 Years of the Rapid Assessment Program (PDF - 12.2 MB)

The RAP surveys have been one of the most original and useful of all of Conservation International's contribution to conservation science and planning. They provide highly informative (and interesting!) reconnaissance reports of potential hot spots, many never before studied, that outline their main features, identify notable parts of the flora and fauna, and thereby measure the urgency of further study and action. The connections with local people and governments by the RAP teams also help raise the awareness of those who are the permanent stewards.
– Edward O. Wilson, Harvard University


About the authors

Leeanne E. Alono is Director of Conservation International's Rapid Assessment Program.
Jessica Deichmann is now a Research Scientist with the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute.
Sheila A. McKenna is a marine ecologist and senior research scientist with SEAlliance.
Piotr Naskrecki is an entomologist, invertebrate conservationist, and nature writer and photographer, currently with the Museum of Comparative Zoology at Harvard University.
Stephen Richards is RAP Manager for the Asia-Pacific region, a Research Associate at the South Australian Museum, and a member of the IUCN Amphibian Red-list Authority.

Still Counting is available through the University of Chicago Press and Amazon.com.

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